The Best Hybrid Mattresses
Photo: Sarah Kobos
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The Best Hybrid Mattresses

Mattress companies pitch hybrids as being the Goldilocks of beds—part coil, part foam; not too springy, not too foamy. But that middle range is vast. A few coils sandwiched between thick cuts of foam won’t add much resilience. A sliver of memory foam deep below the surface can’t tame the jiggle of a thousand springs.

As with conventional foam and innerspring mattresses, with hybrids there’s no single mattress that’s perfect for everyone. And chances are you’ll have to try a range of beds to find one that’s “just right.” We share what to expect as you shop for a hybrid mattress—and we offer a few of our favorite options to help you get started. (To learn more strategies related to finding the right mattress, see our Mattress Buying Guide.)

Our pick

Leesa Hybrid

Leesa Hybrid

Loose-cradling foam, nice bounce

With its balance of cuddly, durable foam and just-springy-enough coils, the Leesa Hybrid has consistently pleased our testers since 2018.

A favorite since we first tested a version of it in 2018, the 11-inch-thick Leesa Hybrid balances curve-conforming cushioning with a little bounce. We love that the foam is a dense—and therefore durable—4 pounds per cubic foot, and that the cover looks and feels equally substantial. The coils for a queen exceed 1,000, offering pressure-relieving support; each coil is individually pocketed to keep sleep partners from waking each other up with tossing and turning. The Leesa Hybrid is a softer variety of medium-firm, so it caters nicely to those who sleep in all three positions. For most folks, including those who weigh over 200 pounds, this mattress should hold up without sagging through its 10-year warranty. You can return it within 100 days for a complete refund.

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Our pick

Tempur-Adapt (Medium Hybrid)

Tempur-Adapt (Medium Hybrid)

A slow, curve-conforming sink

The Tempur-Adapt Medium Hybrid’s abundant memory foam hugs your body’s every contour. And with the help of over 1,000 coils, it offers a sturdy medium-firm feel and great edge support.

The 11-inch-thick Tempur-Adapt (Medium Hybrid) is huggier, slightly firmer, and less bouncy than the Leesa Hybrid. So it may be a dream for people who like a slow, sinky hug and need just a teensy bit of springiness to help them shift in bed more easily. The memory-foam layers are a durable 4½ pounds per cubic foot, with sturdy edge support. A good option for back- and stomach-sleepers, the mattress feels medium-firm. But with its meticulous pressure-relieving properties, it should also suit side-sleepers who prefer firmer beds. We think the bed should last at least up to its 10-year warranty for most people, including those who weigh over 200 pounds. If you don’t like the Tempur-Adapt, you can return it within 90 days for a full refund (minus shipping costs).

Our pick

WinkBed (Luxury Firm)

WinkBed (Luxury Firm)

Quilted foam with two coil layers

Despite having two layers of foam in the pillow-top, the WinkBed feels billowy rather than huggy, and oodles of coils give the bed a pleasant springiness.

Buying Options

$1,300 from WinkBeds
(queen)

$300 off 1st purchase w/code SLEEP300

With a layer of pocketed microcoils under its quilted pillow-top and larger supportive coils (also pocketed) farther below, the 13½-inch-thick WinkBed (Luxury Firm) is closer to an innerspring in its construction and feel. But it also has some foam, which, when blended with those microcoils, creates a pressure-relieving feel that our testers loved. (In our January 2020 innerspring group test, testers overwhelmingly preferred the WinkBed over the three more-conventional innersprings in its price category.) With a medium-firm feel and coils around the perimeter, the bed achieves a stable edge support that many hybrids lack. The WinkBed comes with a lifetime warranty and 120-day trial period.

Everything we recommend

Our pick

Leesa Hybrid

Leesa Hybrid

Loose-cradling foam, nice bounce

With its balance of cuddly, durable foam and just-springy-enough coils, the Leesa Hybrid has consistently pleased our testers since 2018.

Our pick

Tempur-Adapt (Medium Hybrid)

Tempur-Adapt (Medium Hybrid)

A slow, curve-conforming sink

The Tempur-Adapt Medium Hybrid’s abundant memory foam hugs your body’s every contour. And with the help of over 1,000 coils, it offers a sturdy medium-firm feel and great edge support.

Our pick

WinkBed (Luxury Firm)

WinkBed (Luxury Firm)

Quilted foam with two coil layers

Despite having two layers of foam in the pillow-top, the WinkBed feels billowy rather than huggy, and oodles of coils give the bed a pleasant springiness.

Buying Options

$1,300 from WinkBeds
(queen)

$300 off 1st purchase w/code SLEEP300

The research

As Wirecutter’s senior staff writer on sleep, I’ve been testing hybrid mattresses—including the picks in this guide—at home and in our offices for the past two years. I’ve spent hundreds of hours interviewing mattress experts, obsessing over foam specifications, poring over warranties, and touring mattress factories and showrooms. I’m the author of Wirecutter’s guides to the best foam mattresses and the best innerspring mattresses, from which the picks here have been compiled.

Once upon a time, mattress land was populated by only two types of bed: foam mattresses and innerspring mattresses. But over the past several years, a new option took over stores and the internet: hybrid mattresses. Hybrids are exactly what they sound like—a combination of foam and coils in a single bed. Unlike innerspring mattresses, which have almost always had some foam in them, the so-called hybrids are either innersprings with comparatively more-copious amounts of foam or foam mattresses with an added layer or two of springs. Either way, mattress makers have embraced the idea (whether they’ve made significant design changes or not), if only to breathe new life into an old industry.

Typically, a hybrid mattress neither sinks too much nor bounces too much; it provides a feel that’s somewhere between that of an all-foam mattress and a traditional innerspring. How much foam does a hybrid have? How many coils? And in what proportion? There’s no official specification, so the construction, feel, and look of hybrid mattresses can vary widely. Some have substantial layers of foam, a minimal number of coils, a flat surface, and a stretchy “sock” covering, and overall are very similar to many all-foam mattresses. Other hybrids have multiple layers of coil, less foam, and a quilted top with more fiber padding, resembling a traditional innerspring mattress.

Most mattress makers we spoke with would call a mattress a hybrid if substantial layers of foam created the cushioning, the surface was flat, and the entire mattress was shrouded with a “sock” covering. By contrast, an innerspring typically has a quilted top, less foam, and more fiber padding. These descriptions informed how we decided whether to place mattresses that use both foam and spring in our guide to the best foam mattresses or in our guide to the best innerspring mattresses.

For this guide, we’ve taken a slightly broader view. We’ve included two foam-forward hybrids—the Leesa Hybrid and the Tempur-Adapt (Medium Hybrid)—featured in our foam-mattress guide. And we’ve included a top pick from our innerspring guide, the WinkBed (Luxury Firm), which, despite its two coil layers and quilted top, is in fact sold as a hybrid. Each mattress offers a very different feel and is likely to appeal to very different sleepers. But in general, if you think all-foam mattresses are too “sticky” or that innersprings could use a little—or a lot of—cradling, a hybrid might be right for you.

You can’t judge a hybrid (or any mattress) by its specifications alone because, as with a recipe, it’s not just about the ingredients but also how they’re put together. Typically, though, thicker memory-foam layers, especially near the top of the mattress, suggest a huggier sensation than that of a mattress designed with thinner or fewer layers of memory foam placed deeper down. Beds with fewer than 500 support coils (the coils located near the bottom of the mattress) generally feel less supportive than mattresses that have closer to 1,000 coils. But then again, combining this with a denser and/or firmer foam can offset that looser feeling.

Experts we interviewed for our Mattress Buying Guide have told us that, generally speaking, memory foam should have a density of at least 3 pounds per cubic foot, and non-memory-foam polyfoam should have at least 1.8 pounds per cubic foot. These densities should allow the mattress to withstand the weight of two sleepers who each weigh 200 pounds or less, without any sagging or major body indentations over time. Memory foam and polyfoam should be at least 4 pounds per cubic foot and 2 pounds per cubic foot, respectively, to hold up for sleepers who weigh 200 pounds or more. In the case of hybrids, a layer of coils can help safeguard against sagging with less-dense foams, but the ideal combination is quality foams matched with quality coils. Foams located near the top, close to the sleeper, are more vulnerable to wear and tear.

What makes for quality coils? To prevent motion transfer, look for those that are individually wrapped. Consider, too, the gauge (which is how thick the wire is). The lower the gauge, the thicker the coil. Support coils—those in the lower layer of the mattress—prevent beds from outright hammocking, so look for those in roughly the 13- to 15-gauge range. But keep in mind that, depending on the density and firmness of the mattresses’ foam, a mattress maker may opt for slightly thinner coils to soften the overall feel. Sellers often hype the coil count of a mattress as an indicator of quality, but the type of coil matters, too: Even an abundance of thin “microcoils” added only to enhance pressure relief in the top layer won’t enhance mattress durability the way the larger, deeper support coils would.

A hybrid mattress usually costs more than an all-foam or all-innerspring mattress of similar-quality components. But a hybrid also typically delivers a more substantial, nuanced feel than a non-blended counterpart made with similar-quality components. Fortunately, as new hybrid options proliferate, so do less-expensive models. (See the Allswell Luxe Hybrid, a budget option in our list of Notable contenders.) In general, though, you get what you pay for, whether it’s less-dense (and therefore typically less-durable) memory foam, or fewer or thinner coils (which would offer less support). As with any mattress, it’s best to try a hybrid model before you buy it. But if that’s not possible, read the fine print and make sure the trial period and return policy are adequate, in case the bed doesn’t work out.

Since 2018, we’ve sampled dozens of these foam-on-coil mattresses in showrooms and stores. And in our offices we have assessed 13 of them—many of which, in test after test, our staffers chose as their favorites over the competing all-foam or traditional innerspring mattress models. Of the hybrid mattresses listed in this guide (including our Notable contenders), all were assessed as part of testing for our foam guide (except for the WinkBed, which we tested for our innerspring guide). For each mattress, we assessed the materials and construction, based on the advice of experts we interviewed for our Mattress Buying Guide. We then researched their trial periods and warranties, and examined user reviews. We also organized group tests in our offices, in which 20 to 30 Wirecutter staffers evaluated about a dozen mattresses at a time, side by side. They took notes on firmness levels, motion isolation, and edge support, and then rated their favorites in various categories. I then slept on the top-rated mattresses at home for at least a week or two.

The Leesa Hybrid mattress in a bedroom.
Photo: Leesa

Our pick

Leesa Hybrid

Leesa Hybrid

Loose-cradling foam, nice bounce

With its balance of cuddly, durable foam and just-springy-enough coils, the Leesa Hybrid has consistently pleased our testers since 2018.

Who it’s for: The Leesa Hybrid should provide adequate pressure relief for most sleepers, including those who sleep on their side, as well as good support for back- and stomach-sleepers. People who like to shift positions should also find it easy to rotate on this mattress without feeling stuck. The foam is a durable density for people of all weights, including those who weigh over 200 pounds.

How it feels: This hybrid is medium-firm, though more medium than firm. The memory-foam top provides a loose cradle while also mellowing out the coils, resulting in a small but satisfying bounce.

Why it’s great: I slept on a version of this mattress in 2018, when it was called the Leesa Sapira. Given the similar specs, we think that experience still applies: Neither my husband nor I slept hot. And we didn’t feel like we were sliding off when our son (who slips in between us in the middle of the night) abruptly forced us to sleep on the edges of the mattress. This mattress isolated motion well enough that I rarely woke up from the boys’ rolling over. (The current version of the Hybrid is a tad springier than the original 2018 version, though that didn’t noticeably affect motion isolation.)

A video of a person pressing on the Leesa Hybrid mattress with their hand, showing the firmness level of the mattress.
A thousand-plus coils perk up the memory foam with a dash of resilience. Video: Sarah Kobos

Despite being delivered in a box, the 11-inch, 115-pound Leesa Hybrid is made of sturdy materials that should last through its 10-year warranty, particularly if you rotate the mattress on a regular basis and try to sleep in the middle when you can. At 3 and 2 pounds per cubic foot, respectively, the top and third polyfoam layers are of a density that’s suitable for most people, including those who weigh over 200 pounds. The same goes for the 4-pounds-per-cubic-foot memory-foam layer sandwiched between them.

Coil count isn’t everything, but we do like that there is a generous number (a little over 1,000 in a queen) and that each is individually wrapped (which helps with the motion isolation I experienced when I slept on the mattress at home with both my husband and son in the bed). At 6 inches high, and buried under 4 inches of foam, the coils offer less bounce than those in the WinkBed, but more springiness than those in the Tempur-Adapt (Medium Hybrid).

Over the past two years, the Leesa Hybrid has consistently won over more testers during our group tests than competing hybrid mattresses, or has come in a very close second to the Tempur-Adapt (Medium Hybrid). In our most recent test (in early 2020), the Leesa Hybrid beat out the hybrid versions of the Casper and Casper Wave, the Serta iComfort, and the Helix Plus. Twenty-two out of 29 testers chose the Leesa as their favorite or second favorite in that price category, citing its balance of sink and bounce.

A person sitting on the edge of the Leesa Hybrid mattress.
Besides adequate edge support, the Leesa Hybrid features the most sturdy-feeling “sock” cover we’ve seen on foam and hybrid mattresses we’ve tested. Photo: Sarah Kobos

The Leesa Hybrid’s higher foam density, with an assist from the steel coils, leads us to believe it would sustain its shape without sagging for most people, including those who weigh over 200 pounds. In our 2019 group test, seven of our testers weighed more than 200 pounds, and all but one of them preferred the Leesa Hybrid over the Casper Hybrid, the Casper Wave Hybrid, and the Tempur-Adapt (Medium Hybrid). In 2020, two out of four testers who weighed over 200 pounds picked the Leesa Hybrid as their favorite. (The other two preferred the bouncy BedInABox Dual Hybrid or the Helix Plus, a firmer-feeling bed designed for “big & tall” folks.)

You can try the Leesa Hybrid (and compare it to the brand’s other offerings, including the all-foam Leesa and its plusher, higher-end hybrid the Leesa Legend) at select department stores and at the brand’s Dream Gallery stores in New York City or Virginia Beach, Virginia. If you don’t like the Leesa Hybrid, you can return it within 100 days for a full refund—but the company requires that you sleep on it for at least 30 days first.

Flaws but not dealbreakers: For people accustomed to the resilience of the innerspring, this bed may still be too foam-forward. One staffer returned her Leesa Hybrid because she still felt “stuck” in it when she tried to roll over. (If this is a concern, we suggest taking a look at the WinkBed, an innerspring pick that has foam-bed properties but still adequate resilience.)

The mattress shouldn’t outright hammock, thanks to the steel springs, but we spotted some reader complaints about body impressions, despite the relatively dense foam. We suggest rotating the mattress religiously at least every six months, as well as sleeping in the middle whenever you have the bed to yourself (if you’re part of a couple). The warranty covers body impressions that are deeper than an inch, and online reviews consistently describe good customer service, should issues arise.

Compared with the Tempur-Adapt (Medium Hybrid), the Leesa Hybrid has more motion transfer—but that’s the tradeoff for a less-sink-into-your-mattress feel. If that’s a dealbreaker for you, and you’re searching for a huggier, more-contouring feel, you may like the Tempur-Adapt better.

Key specs

Materials: memory foam, polyfoam, 1,041 14½-gauge pocketed coils, polyester-blend cover
Thickness: 11 inches
Firmness options: only one
Free trial period: 100 days
Warranty: 10 years

The Tempur-adapt hybrid mattress shown in a bedroom.
Photo: Sarah Kobos

Our pick

Tempur-Adapt (Medium Hybrid)

Tempur-Adapt (Medium Hybrid)

A slow, curve-conforming sink

The Tempur-Adapt Medium Hybrid’s abundant memory foam hugs your body’s every contour. And with the help of over 1,000 coils, it offers a sturdy medium-firm feel and great edge support.

Who it’s for: The sturdy yet pressure-relieving Tempur-Adapt (Medium Hybrid) should work for most people, regardless of their sleep position. And it’s especially good for those who love a conforming, almost “sticky” foam feeling. This mattress should hold up for those who weigh more than 200 pounds.

How it feels: The Tempur-Adapt is on the firm end of medium-firm. But wait half a second and you’ll feel the mattress sink in slowly to hug every contour of your body while still maintaining support.

Why it’s great: I slept on the Tempur-Adapt in 2018, and I looked forward to going to bed every night that week. The mattress felt like memory foam on steroids, sinking as it conformed to every pressure point (admittedly, it’s possible to feel “stuck” in it). And yet the dense foam and multitude of coils give it a sturdy, supportive surface that kept my back from getting out of whack. And thanks to its dedicated foam border, I could sit on the edge without sliding off.

A video of a person sitting down on the edge of the Tempur-Adapt hybrid mattress.
A slow memory-foam sink is the dominant feel for the Tempur-Adapt (Medium Hybrid), though 1,000-plus springs add support and just a touch of resilience. Video: Sarah Kobos

Over the past couple of years of group testing, the Tempur-Adapt consistently earned the top or runner-up spot for most-favored foam-forward hybrid, either beating out the Leesa Hybrid or lagging just behind it. As one tester explained, “It lets your body sink right in and feels immediately comfortable.”

The Tempur-Adapt’s foams are denser than those of our other picks. The Tempur memory foam in the second layer is a durable 4½ pounds per cubic foot, and the polyfoam-like material in the top layer is 2½ pounds per cubic foot. Both surpass the minimum densities that the experts we spoke with (for our Mattress Buying Guide) said would hold up for the 10-year-warranty period for most people, including those who weigh over 200 pounds. We’d still rotate the mattress religiously, though, to lower the risk of body impressions.

This dense, super-sinky foam is built on top of the springs, so even though there are more than 1,000 of them, they serve more to temper the bed’s “stickiness” than to give bounce. As a result, this bed has better motion isolation than our other two picks.

Flaws but not dealbreakers: Unlike the Leesa Hybrid or the WinkBed, which lots of testers liked and no one outright hated, the Tempur-Adapt was polarizing. Relatively more testers fell deeply in love with its slow, huggy feel, but others couldn’t stand it. If you like any hint of springiness in your mattress, the Tempur-Adapt is not for you.

Memory foam tends to retain heat, so the company touts the Tempur-Adapt’s cover as being “cool to the touch,” and it is indeed, at first contact. But keep in mind that if you do sleep really hot, you’ll probably need more help—perhaps from a fan—to actually sleep noticeably cooler. In fact, among the 36 good-quality (meaning detailed and not incentivized) reviews we collected on the Tempur-Adapt site, heat retention came up several times (though my husband and I didn’t experience this issue).

A product image of the corner of the Tempur-Adapt hybrid mattress.
The company touts the Tempur-Adapt’s cover as being “cool to the touch,” though we don’t think it actually makes much difference to how cool you sleep. Photo: Tempur-Pedic

The Tempur-Adapt costs several hundred dollars more than our other picks. It also has a slightly more onerous return policy than that of the WinkBed and the Leesa. Instead of the typical 100 days, you have 90 days to try the Tempur-Adapt before you must decide to keep or return it. (But you have to try it for at least 30 days.) If you decide to return it, you incur a shipping cost, which can be well over $100. If it’s possible, we recommend that you try it in a store first. But be aware that if you purchase a Tempur-Pedic mattress at a third-party retailer, you’ll be subject to the retailer’s return policy, rather than to Tempur-Pedic’s.

Despite the drawbacks, the Tempur-Adapt line offers a distinctive feel that many may find worth it. There’s also some reassurance in knowing that the brand, which launched in 1992, has been around longer than the length of the typical 10-year warranty most mattresses stand by. (For comparison, WinkBed and Leesa were each founded in 2015.) Unlike our other two picks, the Tempur-Adapt is sent via delivery people, as opposed to shipped in a box.

Key specs

Materials: memory foam, polyfoam, 1,160 16½-gauge pocketed coils, polyester cover
Thickness: 11 inches
Firmness options: only one
Free trial period: 90 days
Warranty: 10 years

The Winkbed hybrid mattress shown in a bedroom.
Photo: Winkbed

Our pick

WinkBed (Luxury Firm)

WinkBed (Luxury Firm)

Quilted foam with two coil layers

Despite having two layers of foam in the pillow-top, the WinkBed feels billowy rather than huggy, and oodles of coils give the bed a pleasant springiness.

Buying Options

$1,300 from WinkBeds
(queen)

$300 off 1st purchase w/code SLEEP300

Who it’s for: The WinkBed in Luxury Firm could appeal to back- and stomach-sleepers, as well as to side-sleepers who prefer a firmer bed. It should hold up for most sleepers, particularly those who weigh less than 200 pounds (and possibly those who weigh a little more).

How it feels: This bed has a medium-firm feel. There’s no memory foam, just polyfoam, so it’s fluffy and cushiony without being particularly huggy, as the Tempur-Adapt (Medium Hybrid) is. A staffer who weighs between 150 and 200 pounds noted, “It was foamy, but you don’t feel as if you’re sinking.” The WinkBed has more bounce than the Leesa Hybrid and the Tempur-Adapt, but that’s not the predominant sensation.

Why it’s great: I slept on this mattress for about a week and found that I fell asleep more comfortably lying on my back or stomach than on my side. The pillowy top might be sufficient for some side-sleepers, but I personally prefer a deeper plush sensation. The Luxury Firm is the WinkBed’s medium option. (It also comes in Softer, designed for side-sleepers; Firmer, for stomach- and back-sleepers; and Plus, for those over 300 pounds. We haven’t tested these.) By contrast, my husband thought the Luxury Firm was too soft. If you’re like him—someone who dislikes any added fluff and prefers sleek, firm, flat surfaces—then this bed isn’t a good option.

A video clip of a person sitting down on the edge of a WinkBed mattress.
Two layers of coils give the WinkBed a bouncier feel than that of our other two hybrid picks, but it’s reined in by a billowy pillow-top. Video: Sarah Kobos

We tested the WinkBed (Luxury Firm) in 2020 for our guide to the best innerspring mattresses. Though WinkBed calls its bed a hybrid, the mattress’ multitude of springs, relatively minimal foam, and quilted top are features that mattress sellers typically use to define an innerspring. When 39 panelists compared the WinkBed against similarly priced innersprings (Avocado, Parachute, Saatva Classic, and Charles P. Rogers Estate SE), the WinkBed was a standout favorite. In fact, more people chose the WinkBed as their overall favorite than any other innerspring we tested, including those that cost twice as much. People were enthusiastic about the plush surface yet sturdy feel. As one tester who weighs more than 200 pounds explained, “It’s cuddly but also supportive.”

A person sitting on the edge of the WinkBed mattress.
Firmer coils in the lower half of the bed create a perimeter that provides stable edge support. Photo: Sarah Kobos

That cushiness comes from the 2-inch pillow-top—a non-memory-foam polyfoam with a density of 1½ pounds per cubic foot. In contrast to conventional “sock” hybrids, like the Leesa and the Tempur-Adapt, the WinkBed has a quilted cover. The quilting jazzes up the surface with a more-textured feel and may also make body impressions less noticeable. Moreover, 1,353 thin, 2½-inch microcoils provide springy, curve-conforming pressure relief that keeps you from feeling “stuck.” Down below, 858 support coils keep your spine from flexing and the mattress borders from sloping. Unlike the 6-inch coils in the Tempur-Adapt and the Leesa Hybrid, the WinkBed’s support coils are 8 inches high, and this gives the bed a comparatively springier feel. As with our other two picks, all of the WinkBed’s coils are pocketed, so you’re less likely to feel your partner roll over.

The WinkBed offers a 120-day trial period, the longest of our picks. But you have to sleep on it for at least 30 days before you can return or exchange the mattress. (You’ll get a full refund for the return. But for exchanges, you’ll have to pay a $50 fee, to cover the cost of shipping your new mattress and getting rid of your original purchase.) If you decide on a different firmness level after the window (or even years later, if your preferences change), you can exchange the mattress for half the cost (plus shipping and haul-away charges).

Flaws but not dealbreakers: We wish WinkBed had a showroom or partnered with national retailers. Without a place to try it before you buy the mattress, it’s hard to know what firmness level would work for you, or whether it’s even something you’d like at all. You’d have to be okay with the probability of paying the $50 fee if you ended up exchanging the mattress to get a different firmness level (returns, however, are free). In online owner reviews, we saw more complaints about the WinkBed being too firm than too soft, so we suggest that you avoid the Firmer version, unless you know you like a really firm bed.

WinkBed ships its mattresses (135 pounds for a queen) rolled up in a box for free. If you want help setting it up, you need to select “Room of Choice” service, which is an additional $130 (and if you want your old mattress removed, that’s another $60). Because the WinkBed is manufactured by a single factory in Wisconsin, it may take up to two weeks to receive your mattress, while other boxed-mattress brands can take as little as one week. (Note, however, that because of the pandemic, delivery schedules for all companies may be delayed.)

As with all mattresses that have a thick pillow-top, you need to rotate the WinkBed diligently to avoid body impressions. Under the warranty, WinkBed will replace the mattress if it develops indentations, but only if they’re more than 1½ inches deep. (By contrast, Leesa will honor the warranty for impressions that are at least 1 inch deep. And Tempur-Pedic requires body impressions of only ¾ inch for a warranty claim.)

Key specs

Materials: polyfoam, 1,353 15-gauge pocketed microcoils, 858 pocketed support coils (14½-gauge interior coils; 13-gauge edge coils), Tencel cover
Thickness: 13½ inches
Firmness options: Softer, Luxury Firm, Firmer, Plus (for those over 300 pounds)
Return or exchange within: 120 days
Warranty: lifetime

Hybrid mattresses are a fast-growing category. The pandemic has limited our group-testing capabilities, but we hope to test more hybrid mattresses as soon as we’re able. At the top of our to-do list: the coil-and-latex Saatva Latex Hybrid mattress; the recently introduced Tuft & Needle Hybrid Mattress; the latest version of the Casper, which has the option of adding coils; and the Legend, the brand’s high-end offering. We also hope to check out Allswell’s The Supreme and Brooklyn Bedding’s Brooklyn Sedona Hybrid in the near future.

Notable contenders

These hybrids either lacked top votes from testers or are made from materials not as high in quality as those in our picks. But they each have a standout feature or two that we think might appeal to some sleepers. All prices are for queen-size mattresses, and are subject to change.

The Allswell Luxe Hybrid mattress shown in a bedroom.
Photo: Allswell

Under $1,000
Allswell introduced a revamped 12-inch Allswell Luxe Hybrid last year, and we hope to retest it soon. If it’s similar to the one we tried in October 2018 (which Allswell suggests it is), then you can expect a sturdy feel, with nearly equal parts bounce and foam. Despite earning a respectable third place among all hybrids (including ones that are considerably more expensive) in our 2018 group test, this mattress didn’t become a pick because its memory-foam layer didn’t meet the 3-pounds-per-cubic-foot memory-foam minimum that experts recommend for those who weigh under 200 pounds. However, we did like that the 6-inch coils are pocketed, thereby limiting motion transfer. And even though there are only 682 coils in a queen—compared with the 1,000 or more in our picks—they nevertheless bolstered the mattress with a supportive feel (and for less than half the price, to boot). We think this mattress makes for a good, crowd-pleasing guest-room bed. You have 100 days to return it for a refund if you don’t like it.

$1,000 to $1,500
The all-foam Casper can be upgraded to a hybrid for a couple hundred dollars more. The version we tested in 2019 is springier than any of our picks, along with a feel that’s almost firm. It has slightly less-dense foam than our picks (3½ pounds per cubic foot, as opposed to 4 or more) and probably fewer coils (the company told us “more than 600,” as opposed to giving us an exact number). However, this mattress is also less expensive, and it offers a distinctive feel that may appeal to some sleepers. In 2020, Casper revamped all of its mattresses, and the company told us the redesigned hybrid feels similar to the version we tested in 2019. We plan to try the new version soon. You have 100 days to return it for a full refund.

$1,500 to $2,500
Be forewarned, if you like to sink into your mattress, the 13-inch-thick BedInABox Dual Hybrid is not for you. It’s both very bouncy and very cushiony, yet it has decent motion isolation, along with a feel that’s quite different from that of any of our picks. This mattress wasn’t an overall favorite, but the testers who liked it really liked it. The polyfoam layers are 3.4 and 2 pounds per cubic foot (specs deemed suitable to handle most sleepers, including those who weigh over 200 pounds), and they’re bolstered by two layers of coils (1-inch pressure-relieving microcoils in the upper half, and 7-inch pocketed support coils in the lower). The BedInABox Dual Hybrid is about the price of the Tempur-Adapt, but with a sale, the cost can be closer to that of the Leesa Hybrid. BedInABox, a rare mattress company that makes its own foam, offers a 20-year warranty, which is twice as long as that of most other mattresses. There’s also a 120-day free trial period, but you have to try the mattress for 60 days before you can return it for a refund.

The moderately priced Helix Plus (which often goes on sale for just under $1,500) leans more innerspring than foam—there’s a bit of bounce to it, combined with a pillowy (as opposed to sinky) feel. Staffers of a range of sizes in our 2020 test liked it, even though the company designed it specifically for sleepers who weigh up to 500 pounds. We’re not sure how realistic that weight allowance is, but we do know that 10 out of 13 people who ranked this mattress best or second best in the hybrid category were under 150 pounds. Although the Helix didn’t have mass appeal among our staffers, we think the materials suggest longevity, at least through its 15-year warranty. The top, faux-latex polyfoam layer is 3 pounds per cubic foot. The middle, memory-foam layer is 4 pounds per cubic foot, just like the Leesa Hybrid’s (the Leesa happens to be a favorite of several testers in the above-200-pounds category). The third layer down (designed to feel like a more-resilient memory foam) is 2½ pounds. Thanks to its 968 individually wrapped 8-inch coils, the mattress felt both substantial and supportive. To return it for a full refund if you don’t like it, you have to try this mattress for at least 30 days—but no more than 100 days.

The Purple Hybrid and the thicker Purple Hybrid Premier (which comes in 3 inches or 4 inches of gridded foam, the latter of which is more like $3,000) are essentially the Purple Mattress, but with springs. The brand touts a gel-like foam grid, which Purple’s founders originally used to create cushioned, pressure-relieving medical products, including padding for wheelchairs. (It now has a cushion for desk chairs, which is a pick in our guide to the best ergonomic seat cushions.) In our 2018 group test, our staffers couldn’t get past the “weird,” jiggly, crackly feel of the mattress. I tried the hybrid versions in-store and found that the added coils only enhanced the jiggly feel. If you’re open to new textures and have back or joint issues, the Purple may be worth trying; it’s available at Mattress Firm and Macy’s stores nationwide. A 210-pound staffer with back pain and his 110-pound wife have been sleeping on the 4-inch Purple Grid version of the Purple Hybrid Premier for several months and have found it “gentler” on the joints than the typical mattress. He reports that it’s comfortable for side-sleeping, but says he finds it too soft for stomach-sleeping. There’s a 100-day free trial, before which you can return the mattress for a full refund, minus shipping costs (and any interest, if you used a payment plan)—but you have to try the mattress for at least 21 days.

The rest

We were less impressed with these options because few testers found them comfortable, and other options may provide better value for your money. Again, all prices are for queen-size mattresses, and are approximate and subject to change.

Under $1,000
The Allswell is the company’s cheapest offering, and it felt that way to most of our testers. If you have the budget to upgrade to the Luxe Hybrid (almost twice as much for a queen), you’ll end up with a much more substantial-feeling mattress. When I tried the less-expensive Allswell at home, I felt myself sliding toward my husband, because of our weight difference, and sloping toward the floor when I retreated to the outer edge. You may have a better experience, however, if you have the bed to yourself.

$1,000 to $1,500
The Brooklyn Bedding Signature (which dips below $1,000 when it's on sale) has good motion isolation, decent-quality foam, and good support, without being too firm. Unfortunately, though, our testers didn’t like the feel of its TitanFlex foam; it felt cushiony yet bouncy, but somehow in an off-putting way, according to staffers who tried it. Comfort is subjective, however, so if you happen to live near one of Brooklyn Bedding’s many showrooms in Arizona, as well as in select cities nationwide, this mattress may be worth a try. We sampled the Medium model, but it also comes in Soft and Firm.

I personally liked the fluffy-topped faux-memory-foam hybrid Helix Midnight, but many of our testers didn’t. Even though it’s more expensive, the Helix Plus feels a lot more substantial, particularly for those who weigh near 200 pounds and up (though lighter testers liked the Plus as well).

$2,000 to $3,000
The 13-inch all-foam Casper Wave comes in a hybrid option. We tested it in 2019, but the brand has revised its materials since then, so we’ll update this guide with our feedback after a retest. If it’s similar (as the company tells us), then you can expect a medium-soft, springy feel. Our testers by far preferred the all-foam Wave, and the hybrid version costs several hundred dollars more than our picks, without offering much higher quality.

About your guide

Joanne Chen

Joanne Chen

Joanne Chen is Wirecutter’s senior staff writer reporting on sleep and, on occasion, other lifestyle topics. Previously, she covered health and wellness as a magazine editor. After an assignment forced her to sleep eight hours a day for a month, she realized that she is, in fact, a smarter, nicer person when she isn’t sleep-deprived.

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